Although still under construction and a few months away from beginning operations, Enviva has begun the process of staffing the Lucedale pellet plant and the Enviva facility at the Port of Pascagoula, the company announced recently.

The positions the company is now trying to fill include area managers, control room operators, electrical technicians, pellet mill operators, maintenance supervisor, maintenance technicians and shift supervisors. For a list of the positions available, the qualifications required and information on applying, please visit the company website at www.envivabiomass.com/careers/ or https://boards.greenhouse.io/enviva.

Hiring is already underway and will continue through the end of May. Enviva expects to fill most of these positions within about six months prior to the plant opening. Pellet mill operations are slated to begin in the last half of this year.

A company spokesperson said Enviva will make every attempt to hire local people first. The Lucedale mill will employ about 90 full-time people and the facility at the Port of Pascagoula will employ about 30 people. The company estimates about 300 new jobs will be indirectly created in the local timber and transportation industries because of the pellet mill.

The new Lucedale pellet mill will produce an estimated 750,000 metric tons of industrial grade wood pellets. These pellets are a renewable fuel source for electric power generating plants in Europe and Asia as an alternative to coal. Established in 2004, Enviva operates pellet mills in North Carolina and Virginia, as well as in Mississippi.

The Lucedale facility will be one of the largest wood pellet producing mills in the world, and will also be the first new large-scale consumer of low-grade southern pine trees and other soft-woods in the George County area in more than a decade. The high density pellets are a combination of both soft and hard woods.

“Every single ton of production this mill will ever produce has already been sold,” Enviva Chairman and CEO John Keppler said when ground was broken for the Lucedale plant. “Not just for next year. Not for just the year after that, but for the next several decades. So, when we say that we are going to be here for a while, we mean it.”

The wood pellets produced in the Lucedale mill are already contracted to go to power plants in Asia, including Japan.

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